How Lynchburg Cooks Supports Hunger Relief in Our Area

We hope you are planning to come to one of our most popular and important events of the year, Lynchburg Cooks for Hunger Relief (LCFHR). This year, on Monday, April 24th, we will showcase over 35 local restaurants and food vendors, along with 6 local beverage providers to bring you the most delicious event in Lynchburg. So often at events, our patrons wonder where the money goes. Does my ticket PAY for all of the wonderful food? Does it pay for the staff and event overhead? The answer is NO! At Lynchburg Cooks, your ticket purchase of $30 beforehand or $35 at the door goes directly to support hunger relief in our area. All funds raised are split into 3 and are given directly to help important non-profit agencies in our area that work to fight hunger. This year those non-profits are DAWN (Donation-A-Week-Neighbor), The Salvation Army, and Neighbors Helping Neighbors of Amherst County. Before we get into the important work of these agencies, we have to tell you HOW your ticket sales are 100% donation to these fabulous agencies. United Way of Central VA (UWCV) only acts as the fiscal officer for this event. Meaning, UWCV takes all donations in, and sends them right back out to the three benefiting agencies chosen each year to be the lucky recipients. Not only is this event run by a 100% volunteer board of restaurant leaders and owners, EVERY single restaurant, food vendor and beverage provider DONATES their product, supplies, staff and time to make this possible. Isn’t that AMAZING??? So, when you are enjoying the yummy eats at this year’s event,...

Walk the Red Carpet with our Paparazzi

The countdown is on to one of the most glamorous events in the Burg, the Red Carpet Gala to benefit United Way of Central VA.  What will you be wearing on our Red Carpet??? Join the Gals from Living in the Heart of Virginia on our red carpet!                   Mike McKendree with The Mike Show on radio 434.com. And our very own, Scot McCarthy! Thanks to all of our VOLUNTEER Paparazzi! Our photographers: Christina Ball, Charisse Wade , Butch Bryant, Steve Romine and Benjamin Brown Our Videographer: Woody Watts A Big thanks to PhotoWorks for the use of their lights for the event! Step aside Jimmy Kimmel, meet our event emcees: Prepare to be entertained at the Second Annual Red Carpet Gala! We’ll see you on the red carpet this Saturday! Get your tickets HERE.      ...
City of Lynchburg Human Services Employees “Live United”

City of Lynchburg Human Services Employees “Live United”

On Friday, December 2nd, employees from the City of Lynchburg’s Department of Human Services visited United Way’s Miller Park office as part of City Manager Bonnie Svrcek’s initiative to have City employees become more familiar with the many health and human service providers and services in the area. The eleven employees helped pack backpacks for our Backpacks for Kids’ Sake program, observed 211 operators as they fielded resource calls, helped our Development staff prepare mailings, and toured Smart Beginnings Central Virginia and their literacy buses, Rex and Gus. We are so thankful this group came to visit to learn more about the many programs and services UWCV and 211 does, as well as for all of the help the Human Services department provides for Lynchburg’s...

The Education Race Gap in Central Virginia

News & Advance reporter Katrina Dix wrote this provocative story Friday, based on information that came out of a day-long board retreat for Lynchburg City Schools. The key finding: “The variable of race actually has a bigger part of telling the story than the variable of poverty,” Jay McClain, the assistant superintendent responsible for instruction told the board, according to Dix. On tests that measure whether students are keeping up with expectations for their grade level, black students throughout the state have recorded lower scores than white students. Part of the reason is that a higher percentage of black students fall into the economically disadvantaged category, and students from economically disadvantaged families have been shown to have a harder time meeting expectations for their grade level. But as McClain pointed out in Dix’s story, the difference in scores can’t be explained entirely by differing family income levels. Even when matching students of the same economic class, white students showed about 20 points higher than black students, Dix reported. The reasons why can be debated, but Superintendent Scott Brabrand said finding the reasons and eventual solutions start by first facing the facts. “We’ve got to be honest about both pieces of it,” Dix quoted him as saying, speaking of both race and economic disadvantage in the city. “It’s complicated … [but] first we’ve got to be able to talk about it, and then we’ve got to be able to do something about it based on what this data is.” The chart below looks at grade-level proficiency test scores for third graders in math and reading. They include students from economically disadvantaged...